See Sooner, Act Faster: How Vigilant Leaders Navigate Digital Turbulence

Published Research

George Day, The Wharton School, and Paul Schoemaker, Senior Fellow, Mack Institute MIT Press, 2019 When turbulence is the new normal, an organization’s survival depends on vigilant leadership that can anticipate threats, spot opportunities, and act quickly when the time is right. In See Sooner, Act Faster, strategy experts GeorgeRead More

Data Analytics Supports Decentralized Innovation

Published Research

Data-analytics technology can accelerate the innovation process by enabling existing knowledge to be identified, accessed, combined, and deployed to address new problem domains.Read More

Breakthrough Recognition: Bias Against Novelty and Competition for Attention

Published Research

Adding to the literature on the recognition and spread of ideas, and alongside the bias against novelty view documented in prior research, we introduce the perspective that articles compete for the attention of researchers who might build upon them. Read More

Situating the Construct of Lean Start-Up: Adjacent Conversations and Possible Future Directions

Published Research

The lean start-up approach has garnered tremendous amount of interest in recent years and has become mainstream among entrepreneurs. However, this practitioners’ conversation has been largely decoupled from the broader academic literature in management and technology strategy. Read More

Pursuing the New While Sustaining the Current: Incumbent Strategies and Firm Value During the Nascent Period of Industry Change

Published Research

This study considers the nascent period of industry change when the prevalent business model is being threatened by a new model, but there is significant uncertainty with respect to whether and when the new model will dominate. Read More

Family Firms and the Stock Market Performance of Acquisitions and Divestitures

Published Research

In this project, I seek to compare how effectively family firms undertake and implement acquisitions and divestitures relative to their non-family counterparts. While family firms are less likely than non-family firms to undertake divestitures, the stock market returns earned by the family firms that undertake these deals exceed those of non-family firms.Read More

Grow Faster by Changing Your Innovation Narrative

Published Research

Managers have no shortage of advice on how to achieve organic sales growth through innovation. Prescriptions range from emulating the best practices of innovative companies like Amazon, Starbucks, and 3M to adopting popular concepts such as design thinking, lean startup principles, innovation boot camps, and co-creation with customers. Read More

Domestic Political Connections and International Expansion: It’s not Only ‘Who You Know’ That Matters

Published Research

Former politicians on the board of directors bring to the firm domestic political connections and political knowledge. Previous research has mainly highlighted the role of contacts, without fully recognizing the role of political knowledge accumulated at home. Read More

Explaining Organic Growth Performance: Why Dynamic Capabilities Need Strategy Guidance

Published Research

Why are some firms consistently able to grow faster than their rivals in the same industry? We employ dynamic capabilities theory to show that organic growth leaders excel because they have innovation prowess. Read More

Responses to Rival Exit: Product Variety, Market Expansion, and Preexisting Market Structure

Published Research

This study investigates incumbent responses to a main rival’s exit. We argue that long‐time rivals have developed an equilibrium by offering a mix of overlapping and unique products and by choosing geographic proximity to each other. A rival’s exit, however, disrupts this equilibrium and motivates surviving firms to expand in both product and geographic spaces to seek a new equilibrium. Read More

Power Transitions in the Host Country and the Survival of Subsidiaries in Infrastructure Industries

Published Research

We argue that for firms competing in infrastructure industries, a change in the government that granted the permission to invest in the host country increases the likelihood of divestment of foreign subsidiaries. Read More

Trade Secrets and Innovation: Evidence from the “Inevitable Disclosure” Doctrine

Published Research

Does heightened employer‐friendly trade secrecy protection help or hinder innovation? By examining U.S. state‐level legal adoption of a doctrine allowing employers to curtail inventor mobility if the employee would “inevitably disclose” trade secrets, we investigate the impact of a shifting trade secrecy regime on individual‐level patenting outcomes. Read More

The Impact of Patient Centered Medical Homes on Medication Adherence

Published Research

Accreditation of providers helps resolve the pervasive information asymmetries in health care markets. However, meeting accreditation standards typically involves flexibility in implementation, leading to heterogeneity in performance. Read More

The Effects of Proprietary Information on Corporate Disclosure and Transparency: Evidence from Trade Secrets

Published Research

I examine the effects of proprietary information on corporate transparency and voluntary disclosure. To do so, I develop and validate two measures of firms’ reliance on trade secrecy: one based on 10-K disclosures and one based on subsequent litigation outcomes. Read More

Imprinting and Early Exposure to Developed International Markets: The Case of the New Multinationals

Published Research

Previous research has analyzed the imprinting effect associated with the firm’s international expansion without considering the full range of differences between home and host countries. These differences are important because, depending on the development gap, and the direction of the difference, learning opportunities and the possibility of upgrading firm’s capabilities will be vastly different. Read More

Modeling the Diffusion of Complex Innovations as a Process of Opinion Formation through Social Networks

Published Research

Complex innovations – ideas, practices, and technologies that hold uncertain benefits for potential adopters — often vary in their ability to diffuse in different communities over time. To explain why, I develop a model of innovation adoption in which agents engage in naïve (DeGroot) learning about the value of an innovation within their social networks.Read More

The Economics of Patient-Centered Care

Published Research

The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a widely-implemented model for improving primary care, emphasizing care coordination, information technology, and process improvements. However, its treatment as an undifferentiated intervention obscures meaningful variation in implementation. Read More