Economic Nationalism, Productivity and Innovation: Evidence from a Developing Country

Funded Research Proposal

Economic nationalism is an ideology which favors policies that emphasize domestic control of the economy. Previous work has documented that firm innovation/investment and firm productivity are important for economic growth. Hence, understanding how barriers to firm innovation/investment and restrictions on firm productivity is crucial to the study of development. Read More

Frenemies: The Influence of Competitors’ Cooperation on Technological Adoption

Funded Research Proposal

The development and adoption of new innovative technologies confront firms into making decisions in highly uncertain environment. Past experience and the available public information are seldom sufficient to support firms in their decision process; firms ability to experiment and produce new information is then paramount. Read More

Closer Workers, More Productive Workers? 

Working Papers

A worker’s commuting distance to the workplace may have implications for her productivity through channels such as costly travel time and reduced knowledge spillovers, and these costs may drive observed agglomerative spatial patterns previously identi fied in the literature.Read More

Can Displaced Labor be Retrained? Evidence from Quasi-Random Assignment to Trade Adjustment Assistance

Working Papers

The extent to which workers adjust to labor market disruptions in light of increasing pressure from trade and automation commands widespread concern. However, surprisingly little is known about efforts that deliberately target the adjustment process.Read More

Plant Operations and Product Recalls in the Automotive Industry: An Empirical Investigation

Published Research

While there is overwhelming support for the negative consequences of product recalls, empirical evidence of operational drivers of recalls is almost nonexistent. In this study, we identify product variety, plant variety, and capacity utilization as drivers of subsequent manufacturing-related recalls.Read More

Can the State Pick Winners? Comparing Firm Outcomes from a Random Subsidy Lottery and Innovation-Targeted Subsidy Formula

Funded Research Proposal

In 2011, California Governor Jerry Brown recognized several of the state’s existing firm incentive policies aimed at catalyzing innovative activity in the state, to be ineffectual, citing poor incentive design.Read More

Do Local Production Subsidies Spur New Innovation Hubs?

Funded Research Proposal

The extent to which local incentive policies (such as subsidies and tax credits) are effective at spurring new centers of innovation, and whether these incentives induce overall productivity growth or just a shift of production from one region to another, is the subject of this proposal.Read More

Institutional Change and Productivity Growth in China’s Manufacturing: The Microeconomics of Knowledge Accumulation and “Creative Restructuring”

This article investigates the microeconomics underlying the spectacular growth of productivity in China’s manufacturing sector over the period 1998–2007. Underlying the aggregate evidence of such dramatic growth, one observes a large, albeit shrinking, intra-sectoral heterogeneity coupled with an even more important process of learning and knowledge accumulation.Read More

The Impact of Industrial Policy and Export Processing Zones on Technological Growth: Evidence from a Panel of 7 Million Indian Firm Financial Statements

Funded Research Proposal

Scholars of industrial, trade, and urban economics have long been concerned with understanding the determinants of firm growth, and the mechanisms through which it propagates. Central to research in this area is the question of what role externalities and market imperfections play (if any) in hindering total factor productivity (TFP) growth.Read More

The Impact of New Product Introduction on Plant Productivity in the North American Automotive Industry

Published Research

Product launch—an event when a new product debuts for production in a plant—is an important phase in product development. But launches disrupt manufacturing operations, resulting in productivity losses. Using data from North American automotive plants from years 1999–2007, we estimate that a product launch entails an average productivity loss of 12%–15% at the plant level.Read More