See Sooner, Act Faster: How Vigilant Leaders Navigate Digital Turbulence

Published Research

How Vigilant Leaders Thrive in an Era of Digital Turbulence George Day, The Wharton School, and Paul Schoemaker, Senior Fellow, Mack Institute MIT Press, 2019 When turbulence is the new normal, an organization’s survival depends on vigilant leadership that can anticipate threats, spot opportunities, and act quickly when the timeRead More

Exploring Power and Innovation in Multi-party Alliances

Funded Research Proposal

This research project seeks to explore how differences within the members of a multi-party alliance (MPA) – specifically differences in power – impact innovative outcomes of the alliance using a unique dataset of over 345,000 pages of project documents covering approximately 3000 MPAs.Read More

In the Shadow of the Valley: Private Equity Firms’ Increased Prominence in High-Tech Acquisitions

Funded Research Proposal

Why and how do private equity (PE) firms engage in technology acquisitions, and how do they create and capture value in these transactions? Observational data shows initial evidence that not only are PE firms engaging in an increasing number of technology buyouts, they are also seemingly behaving in distinct ways from both corporate acquirers, as well as PE firms in industries other than high-tech.Read More

The Globalization of R&D and Human Capital Flows

Funded Research Proposal

My research studies innovation and technological change, with a special focus on the changing structure of the R&D activities of multinational firms. Multinational firms account for the majority of innovation investment worldwide. However, while innovation within these firms historically has been spatially concentrated in the home country, that concentration has changed dramatically in the past 20 years.Read More

Race to E-Commerce: The Role of Firm Owners in Technology Adoption

Funded Research Proposal

This study aims to understand how firm ownership and governance influence the adoption of disruptive technologies in the early stages of the technology cycle. There is a growing recognition that owners have different goals and motivations that in turn, shape the strategic direction of the firms they control.Read More

Gender Differences in Founder’s HR Strategy and What Works When? Evidence from New Ventures in Innovation Industries

Funded Research Proposal

This project examines gender differences in founder’s human resource (HR) strategy and how such differences impact business outcomes, focusing on nascent ventures in high-tech innovative industries.Read More

Innovation Through Diversity: Understanding The Ever-Changing Consumer Landscape

Funded Research Proposal

As firms look to innovate, attention must be paid to the role cultural diversity (e.g. racial and gender diversity) plays in consumer interest in new products. In today’s society, firms need an understanding of how diversity can be used as an asset to engage consumers with their brands.Read More

The Enemy of My Enemy Is My Friend: A New Condition for Two-sided Matching with Complementarities

Working Papers

For relatively large firms, especially multinationals, it is often a difficult human resource task to assign employees to different country offices, departments, divisions, or teams in the best possible way. This task can be extremely delicate and complex, especially when a company has many employees to go through the (re)assignment process. Read More

Who Benefits from Having a Partner? Intrinsic Motivation, Partnership Decisions, and the Chance of Becoming a Profitable Firm

Working Papers

Entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial firms are often the drivers of innovation, and success for entrepreneurial firms often means development and introduction of innovative products and services. This project examines the role that having a partner plays in early-stage entrepreneurial firm performance.Read More

Organizational Change and the Dynamics of Innovation: Formal R&D Structure and Intrafirm Inventor Networks

Working Papers

Prior studies have shown associations between organizational structure and innovation. However, most have been static and cross sectional, only showing variation across firms. This gap is problematic because it is not clear if firms can use structure as a lever to direct their research outcomes.Read More

Happy Ever After? Collaborative Experience, Collaborative Performance, and Subsequent Independent Product Innovation

Working Papers

This study examines the extent to which firms that are collaborating with other firms in a particular area of business subsequently change modes of governance and undertake independent activities in the same area of business. Read More

Needless Distraction or Font of Knowledge: Understanding the Relationship between Divestitures and Innovation

Working Papers

Few studies have examined the impact of divestitures on the innovation performance of firms. In particular, little attention has been paid into how the divestiture of firms’ non-core businesses could influence the innovation outcomes of their core businesses. Read More

When Time-Off Sparks Time-At-Work: Time-Off as a Source of Competitive Advantage for Innovation

Working Papers

The management view of human capital as a source of sustained competitive advantage
has driven research on how strategic human resource practices affect organizational performance. This paper focuses on how a firm’s time-off policy can be a source of competitive advantage in entrepreneurial settings, particularly for innovation.Read More

Intellectual Property Rights, Professional Business Services and Top Wage Inequality

Working Papers

High skill labor demand is infrequent but firms cannot adjust perfectly due to several adjustment costs. Professional Business Services (PBS) sector help alleviate this problem by allowing high skill labor to move across firms, reducing idiosyncratic part of labor demand risk.Read More

Saying Hello and Waving Goodbye: Intra-Organizational Tie Formation in The Face of Collaborator Departure

Working Papers

Indirect ties play an important role in the formation of new collaborative relationships. Yet we know little about how the mobility of such indirect ties changes the role that they play. In this paper, I explore how the organizational exit of common collaborators influences tie formation between previously unconnected workers. Read More

Do Institutional Reforms Perpetuate or Mitigate the Matthew Effect? Intellectual Property Rights and Access to International Alliances

Working Papers

We explore how intellectual property rights (IPR), a type of formal institution, affect firms’ access to global alliance networks and their positioning within those networks. We employed a difference-in-difference design to assess the impact of IPR reforms across thirteen countries.Read More