Predicting Startup Survival Using the Normalized Burn Rate

Working Papers

How much to spend is a key managerial decision for entrepreneurs. Arguments favoring lean startups rely on the burden of rapid growth, reduced monitoring costs or the ineffcient use of cash. Arguments favoring high “burn rates” rely on the early creation of economies of scale and complementary assets; and the motivation benefits of efficiency wages and experimentation.Read More

The Economics of Patient-Centered Care

Working Papers

The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a widely-implemented model for improving primary care, emphasizing care coordination, information technology, and process improvements. However, its treatment as an undifferentiated intervention obscures meaningful variation in implementation. Read More

Can the State Pick Winners? Comparing Firm Outcomes from a Random Subsidy Lottery and Innovation-Targeted Subsidy Formula

Funded Research Proposal

In 2011, California Governor Jerry Brown recognized several of the state’s existing firm incentive policies aimed at catalyzing innovative activity in the state, to be ineffectual, citing poor incentive design.Read More

Do Local Production Subsidies Spur New Innovation Hubs?

Funded Research Proposal

The extent to which local incentive policies (such as subsidies and tax credits) are effective at spurring new centers of innovation, and whether these incentives induce overall productivity growth or just a shift of production from one region to another, is the subject of this proposal.Read More

Thriving Innovation Amidst Manufacturing Decline: The Detroit Auto Cluster and the Resilience of Local Knowledge Production

Analyzing the comprehensive 35-year patent data set associated with the Detroit auto cluster we confirm that innovation in clusters can increase in spite of a long-term decline in manufacturing activity. The “stickiness” of local knowledge is sustained by: (i) increasing technological specialization at the local level and (ii) growing connectedness to global centers of excellence.Read More

Intra-Firm Spillovers? The Stock and Flow Effects of Collocation

Working Papers

We study how intra-firm collocation—geographic clustering of business establishments owned by the same parent company—influences performance, decomposing the collocation effect into stocks and flows to learn about the mechanisms behind intra-firm agglomeration.Read More

Analyzing Knowledge Communities Using Foreground and Background Clusters

Published Research

Insight into the growth (or shrinkage) of “knowledge communities” of authors that build on each other’s work can be gained by studying the evolution over time of clusters of documents. We cluster documents based on the documents they cite in common using the Streemer clustering method, which finds cohesive foreground clusters (the knowledge communities) embedded in a diffuse background.Read More

Positioning knowledge: schools of thought and new knowledge creation

Published Research

Cohesive intellectual communities called “schools of thought” can provide powerful benefits to those developing new knowledge, but can also constrain them. We examine how developers of new knowledge position themselves within and between schools of thought, and how this affects their impact.Read More

Innovating knowledge communities – An analysis of group collaboration and competition in science and technology

Published Research

A useful level of analysis for the study of innovation may be what we call “knowledge communities” — intellectually cohesive, organic inter-organizational forms. Formal organizations like firms are excellent at promoting cooperation, but knowledge communities are superior at fostering collaboration — the most important process in innovation.Read More