Organizational Matching

Funded Research Proposal

For relatively large firms, especially multinationals, it is often a difficult human resource task to assign employees to different country offices, departments, divisions, or teams in the best possible way. This task can be extremely delicate and complex, especially when a company has many employees to go through the (re)assignment process. Read More

The International Configurations of US Multinational Corporations

Published Research

This paper explores how key insights from highly cited and well-used frameworks that describe the strategies and structures of MNCs are reflected in the international configurations of US MNCs. I perform a cluster analysis on a comprehensive and confidential database that covers the population of US MNCs.Read More

Managing Valuable Knowledge in Weak IP Protection Countries

Published Research

Although knowledge assets provide multinational corporations with competitive advantages in foreign markets, it can be difficult for firms to protect their knowledge in foreign countries – especially countries with weak intellectual property (IP) protection.Read More

How Does Performance Feedback Affect Boundary Spanning in Multinational Corporations? Insights from Technology Scouts

Published Research

As much as prior research has shed light on the boundary-spanning processes of global organizations and their (positive) impact on an MNC’s performance, whether, when and how past performance ultimately shapes an MNC’s boundary-spanning activities remains an open question in management research.Read More

Microfoundations of Patenting in Firms

Working Papers

In large, globally dispersed firms, collective efforts to develop innovations often involve boundary-spanning, in the form of collaboration across organizational areas or geographic locations. We study how the level of boundary-spanning required influences the likelihood of co-patenting between individuals in different organizational areas or geographic locations.Read More

Imprinting And Early Exposure To Developed International Markets: The Case Of The New Multinationals

Working Papers

Organizational theorists label as imprinting the impact of the environment on the organizational structure and processes during some sensitive periods in the life of an organization, like the initial exposure to international markets. In the field of international management, the most important imprinting effect has generally been associated with the country of origin of the firm.Read More

Replicating the Multinationality-Performance Relationship: Is There an S-Curve?

Published Research

Our study examines the relationship between a firm’s multinationality and its performance. In a much-cited study, Lu and Beamish (2004) found evidence of an S-shaped relationship—with firm performance first decreasing, then increasing, then decreasing again as firms internationalized—in a sample of Japanese firms from 1986 to 1997.Read More

The External Knowledge Sourcing Process in Multinational Corporations

Published Research

We study the processes through which multinational corporations (MNCs) identify and make use of external sources of knowledge. Based on a seven year longitudinal study of one MNC’s overseas scouting unit, we show how a simple one-directional “channelling” process gradually gave way to three higher value-added processes, labelled “translating”, “matchmaking” and “transforming.”Read More

Selective attention and the initiation of the global knowledge-sourcing process in multinational corporations

Published Research

Multinational corporations (MNCs) frequently use their foreign subsidiaries to identify new opportunities to access external knowledge. This article builds on the attention-based view to examine how selective attention – the focus on certain issues or answers at the exclusion of others – works in the global knowledge-sourcing process in MNCs.Read More

Global Sourcing and Foreign Knowledge Seeking

Published Research

We develop and test a rigorous theoretical account of firm global sourcing decisions, distinguishing the antecedents of offshore integration from those of offshore outsourcing. Although traditional theories of global sourcing focus on lowering costs, we argue that as high-performing firms seek to develop new capabilities by tapping into foreign knowledge, they will increasingly turn to offshore integration to reap colocation benefits and overcome expropriation challenges.Read More

When Do Firms Divest Foreign Operations?

Published Research

Extant literature on divestment has repeatedly found that firms are likely to divest their poorly performing operations. In this paper, I consider how product market relatedness and geographic market differences in growth, policy stability, and exchange rate volatility can moderate the negative relationship between performance and divestment.Read More

Service Diversity, Offshore Leverage, Vendor Reputation, and Performance of Customer Accounts in Software Outsourcing

Working Papers

This paper studies the impact of delivering widely diverse services, managing dispersed teams across time zones, and building vendor reputation for quality services, on performance at the customer account level and shows how firms can sustain competitive advantage.Read More

Why seeking help from teammates is a blessing and a curse:  A theory of help seeking and individual creativity in team contexts

Published Research

Research has not explored the extent to which seeking help from teammates positively relates to a person’s own creativity. This question is important to explore as help seeking is commonly enacted in organizations and may come with reciprocation costs that may also diminish creativity.Read More