Vigilant Leadership and Disruptive Innovations

Funded Research Proposal

In 2004 the Mack Institute sponsored a conference on “Peripheral Vision: Detecting the Weak Signals that can Make or Break Your Company,” that led to a book of the same title with Paul Schoemaker, and seven further articles. During the past decade our approach has been applied to dozens of companies and spawned two major research initiatives. Read More

Experimentation in Early-Stage Ventures: Evidence from the U.S. Software Industry

Funded Research Proposal

By allowing ventures to obtain market feedback during the product development process, experimentation confers a learning advantage. However, we know little about its costs. In particular, experimenting with an early-stage idea requires some degree of disclosure, leading to imitation risk. Read More

Is FDI Good News for Local Entrepreneurs? Evidence from China

Funded Research Proposal

In opening their markets, governments in developing countries hope to receive foreign direct investment. In addition to direct wage and employment benefits, they also hope that foreign investment can facilitate the growth of local businesses. Read More

Intellectual Property Rights, Professional Business Services and Top Wage Inequality

Funded Research Proposal

High skill labor demand is infrequent but firms cannot adjust perfectly due to several adjustment costs. Professional Business Service Firms help alleviate this problem by allowing high skill labor to move across firms, reducing idiosyncratic part of labor demand risk. Read More

Impact of Automation and Globalization on Extreme Political Preferences

Funded Research Proposal

In this proposal, we argue that support of populism can be explained by the interaction between individual economic and social experiences and aggregate economic shocks. We test empirically if personal experiences, information environment, and their interaction with aggregate economic shocks shape people’s political decisions. Read More

Information Provision in the Housing Market

Funded Research Proposal

Improvements in information technology in recent decades has changed our lives and upended industries. One of its major impacts is to make previously inaccessible information accessible, reduce information asymmetries and improve market efficiencies.Read More

The Effects of Message Ephemerality on Communicators

Funded Research Proposal

Most digital communication platforms store content and allow users to see it multiple times. Despite the benefits that recording content holds for both users and companies, many applications delete it after it was seen by the receiver (i.e., ephemeral communication channels). Read More

Why Do Firms Offer Dicey Perks? The Case of Unlimited Vacation

Funded Research Proposal

The use of employee perks is becoming increasingly important to organizational competitiveness. Consequently, innovating along the human resource dimension has become a strategy imperative for many firms. Typically, firms introduce perks that are complementary to work. However, another set of perks that makes it easier for people to leave the workplace has gain more popularity over time. Read More

How Data Analytics can Improve Innovation Quality post IPO

Funded Research Proposal

This proposal explores how the new generation of information technologies (IT) including AI, automation and data analytics, affect how firms innovate. In particular, we focus on the effect of innovation after a firm went through an IPO. Read More

Blockchain and the Value of Operational Transparency

Funded Research Proposal

The project aims to explore the extent to which blockchain technology can be ported to alleviate information asymmetry issues in the context of supply chain financing. In particular, firms seeking the capital needed to efficiently run their operations are often impeded by severe information asymmetry issues. Read More

How IT Innovation Affects Job Design

Funded Research Proposal

The proposed study analyzes a data set of over eighty million online job listings from the years 2010 to 2016 (about 1 to 2 million each month). The data include job titles, locations (MSA), industry (NAICS), employer names — and most importantly for this analysis — detail on the specific skills required for a job. Read More

How the People at the Interface Shape Interfirm Partnerships: Evidence from Simultaneous CVC Investments

Funded Research Proposal

Research examining whether corporate venture capital investments create value, either for startups or established firms, has largely adopted a binary characterization of these relationships, i.e. ‘CVC’ vs ‘no CVC.’ From the startup perspective this entails comparing on average the outcomes of startups that receive CVC investment vs ones that don’t. Read More

The Risky Samaritan Effect: How Risky Benefits to Social Innovation Pay Off

Funded Research Proposal

Consumers are often skeptical of social innovation (e.g., CSR), thinking that firms undertake such innovations to increase profit rather than to “do the right thing.” How can firms convey the social and monetary benefits of investing in social innovations to consumers and stakeholders to best improve their brand image?Read More

Homophily and Consolidation in Intra-Firm Collaboration Networks and their Impact on Innovation Output

Funded Research Proposal

Research in management science has long posited that network structures, specifically the patterns of informal interactions among people, affect information flows and knowledge recombination. Yet, how do different network topologies affect the production of new knowledge and ideas? Read More

The Role of Pharmacy Benefit Managers in Driving Pharmaceutical Prices and Utilization

Funded Research Proposal

The business model of Pharmacy Benefit Managers (PBMs) has evolved dramatically over the last few decades from basic insurance claims processors to becoming one of the key drivers of pharmaceutical pricing and utilization in the U.S. PBMs are the “middlemen” between insurers and drug manufacturers.Read More

Loopholes of Creative Obstruction: The Strategic Gaming of Patent Claims and Families

Funded Research Proposal

This will be a mixed-methods study exploring, for the first time, ways in which firms exploit technicalities in the U.S. patent system with regard to number of claims and continuations. While at first blush this may sound like a technical paper targeting a patent policy audience, it actually will tell us a lot about the revealed strategic positions of hundreds of innovative firms and institutions. Read More

Happy Ever After? Collaborative Experience, Collaborative Performance, and Subsequent Independent Product Innovation

Funded Research Proposal

This study examines the extent to which firms that are collaborating with other firms in a particular area of business subsequently change modes of governance and undertake independent activities in the same area of business. Read More