Small Worlds in Context: How Network Evolution and Performance Vary with Network Type

Funded Research Proposal

While much strategic management research examines network evolution through a micro-level focus on the dyads composing networks, far fewer studies have attempted to analyze network structure and evolution at the more macro level of aggregate networks. Read More

Conflict, Cooperation, and Consensus in Standards-Setting

Funded Research Proposal

We study how firms simultaneously engage in competition and cooperation in technology standard-setting multipartner alliances. Departing from prior research that has typically explored competition in isolation from cooperation, we bridge these two literatures by examining firm communication and community consensus in these venues.Read More

Competition-Cooperation Interplay During Multiparty Technology Coordination: The Effect of Firm and Community Heterogeneity on Consensus Standards Formation

Working Papers

We study how competitive and cooperative motivations simultaneously shape firm-level interactions and community-level outcomes in a unique multiparty arrangement, the technology standards-setting organization (SSO).Read More

Keeping Steady As She Goes: A Negotiated Order Perspective on Technological Evolution

Published Research

A central idea in the theory of technology cycles is that social and political mechanisms are most important during the selection of a dominant design, and that eras of incremental change are socially uninteresting periods in which innovation is driven by technological momentum and elaboration of the dominant design.Read More

Social Capital for Hire? Mobility of Technical Professionals and Firm Influence in Wireless Standards Committees

Published Research

The movement of personnel between firms has been shown to have important implications for firms, yet there has been little direct investigation of the underlying mechanisms. We propose that in addition to their human capital, mobile individuals carry social capital, affecting the outcomes of the firms they join and leave by altering the patterns of interaction between firms.Read More